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Autonomous Vehicles in Defense

Autonomous Vehicles in Defense

In this interview, Dr. Robert Sadowski, Chief Roboticist, US Army Tank Automotive Research, Development & Engineering Center, shares insight on autonomous vehicles in defense, defense applications and more.

Dr. Robert W. Sadowski is a member of the Scientific and Professional (ST) cadre of the Senior Executive Service and serves as the Robotics Senior Research Scientist within the Research, Technology and Integration Directorate at the US Army Tank Automotive Research, Development and Engineering Center (TARDEC) in Warren, MI. Recently selected to this position after a long career within the Army culminating as an Academy Professor and Electrical Engineering Program Director in the Department of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science at the United States Military Academy where he was instrumental in developing the Academy's robotics program, facilities, and outreach. He also has over forty months of operational experience in Southwest Asia in a variety of leadership, staff, and engineering positions including Iraq and recently Afghanistan.

Post Show Report: Looking Back at Future Ground 2017

Post Show Report: Looking Back at Future Ground 2017

Want to learn more about what happened in 2017? Check out our Post Show Report that highlights: attendee statistics, top speaking sessions, what to expect in 2018 and more!

The Army's NGCV Modernization & Acquisition Priorities for 2019

The Army's NGCV Modernization & Acquisition Priorities for 2019

To successfully build the NGCV by 2035, several new and promising technologies are being applied in the combat vehicles space. Among these promising technologies, artificial intelligence, active protection systems (APS), and robotics are scheduled to be implemented in the near future. In addition to looking at the latest technologies, we also highlighted the largest procurements in the Department of Defense's FY19 budget request, as well as all of the active NGCV opportunities.


Overcoming the "Heavy" Price of More Armor: Interim Solutions for Tank and Fighting Vehicle Vulnerabilities

Overcoming the "Heavy" Price of More Armor: Interim Solutions for Tank and Fighting Vehicle Vulnerabilities

After focusing on counterinsurgency and asymmetric warfare in the Middle East, Africa and Southwest Asia for nearly two decades, the U.S. military is changing the way it will fight in the next 30 years. The rise of China as a global competitor and Russia’s increasing belligerence in the regions around the Baltic and Black seas, have U.S. military planners – especially in the Army – rethinking their procurement needs, including what kind of armored ground combat vehicles will be needed. Download this article to learn more about the Army's plans to find interim solutions for tank and fighting vehicle vulnerabilities.

Unmanned Solutions for Ground Combat Systems: with Johns Hopkins University

Unmanned Solutions for Ground Combat Systems: with Johns Hopkins University

In this interview, Dr. Reed Young, Program Manager – Robotics and Autonomy, Johns Hopkins University Applied Physics Laboratory discusses current requirements in unmanned solutions for ground combat systems, opportunities are there for unmanned capabilities, short and long term goals concerning unmanned solutions, and progression of unmanned solutions within the next 5-10 years. If you would like a copy emailed to you, email geena.monaco@idga.org.

Tremendous Three Vehicle Modernization and Modifications

Tremendous Three Vehicle Modernization and Modifications

Three program managers, Colonel James Shirmer, Michael Milner and Glen Dean. And an overview of their upcoming program requirements for the AFV, AMPV and SBCT. If you would like a copy emailed to you, email geena.monaco@idga.org.

The U.S. Army Robotic and Autonomous Systems Strategy in the Near, Mid and Far-term

The U.S. Army Robotic and Autonomous Systems Strategy in the Near, Mid and Far-term

The Army expresses its vision for Robotic and Autonomous Systems (RAS) by outlining realistic objectives in the near-term (2017-2020), feasible objectives in the mid-term (2021-2030), and visionary objectives for the far-term (2031-2040) and was taken from the “The U.S. Army Robotic and Autonomous Systems Strategy” report. If you would like a copy emailed to you, email idga@idga.org.